Financial Assistance Options

No matter what type of health insurance your patient has, they may have options to help them afford their medicine. Options may be available to your patient even if they have no insurance at all.

Get Started with Financial Assistance Tool

Use our financial assistance tool to see which programs may be right for your patient.

Get started

If you would rather talk through some potential options, call us at 866-4ACCESS (866-422-2377) (6AM-5PM PST, Monday through Friday).

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Help With Co-pay Costs

These programs help your patient pay for OCREVUS if they have insurance but still need help with costs:

Help With Costs for OCREVUS

Co-pay Card Assistance

With the OCREVUS Co-pay Program, eligible patients with commercial insurance could pay as little as $5 per treatment for OCREVUS. Co-pay assistance of up to $20,000 is provided per calendar year.

Your patient may be eligible if they:

  • Are taking OCREVUS for an FDA-approved use
  • Are 18 years of age or older or have a Legally Authorized Person over the age of 18 to manage the program
  • Have commercial (private or non-governmental) insurance. This includes plans available through state and federal health insurance exchanges
  • Live and receive treatment in the United States or U.S. Territories
  • Are not receiving assistance through the Genentech Patient Foundation or any other charitable organization for the same expenses covered by the program
  • Do not use a state or federal healthcare plan to pay for your medication. This includes, but is not limited to, Medicare, Medicaid and TRICARE

Help With Costs for Infusion

Co-pay Card Assistance

With the OCREVUS Co-pay Program, eligible patients with commercial insurance couldpay as little as $5 per OCREVUS infusion. Co-pay assistance is provided up to $1,500 per calendar year in the first year and up to $1,000 each calendar year after.

Your patient may be eligible if they:

  • Are taking OCREVUS for an FDA-approved use
  • Are 18 years of age or older or have a Legally Authorized Person over the age of 18 to manage the program
  • Have commercial (private or non-governmental) insurance. This includes plans available through state and federal health insurance exchanges
  • Live and receive treatment in the United States or U.S. Territories
  • Are not receiving assistance through the Genentech Patient Foundation or any other charitable organization for the same expenses covered by the program*
  • Do not use a state or federal healthcare plan to pay for your medication. This includes, but is not limited to, Medicare, Medicaid and TRICARE
  • Do not live or get treatments in certain states (Massachusetts or Rhode Island)

*Patients may use the OCREVUS Co-pay Program for their infusion costs if they are receiving their medicine from the Genentech Patient Foundation.

The Product and Administration Co-pay Programs are valid ONLY for patients with commercial (private or non- governmental) insurance who have a valid prescription for a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved indication of a Genentech medicine. Patients using Medicare, Medicaid or any other federal or state government program (collectively, “Government Programs”) to pay for their Genentech medicine and/or administration services are not eligible.

Under the Programs, the patient may pay a co-pay for drug costs and a co-pay for administration costs. The final amount owed by a patient may be as little as $0 for the Genentech medicine or administration of the Genentech medicine (see Program specific details). The total patient out-of-pocket cost is dependent on the patient’s health insurance plan. The Programs assist with the cost of the Genentech medicine and the Genentech medicine administration only. It does not assist with the cost of other administrations, medicines, procedures or office visit fees. After reaching the maximum Programs’ benefit amounts, the patient will be responsible for all remaining out-of-pocket expenses. The amount of the Programs’ benefits cannot exceed the patient’s out-of-pocket expenses for the cost of the Genentech medicine or administration fees associated with the Genentech medicine.

All participants are responsible for reporting the receipt of all Programs’ benefits as required by any insurer or by law. The Programs are only valid in the United States and U.S. Territories and are void where prohibited by law. The Drug Co-pay Program shall follow state restrictions in relation to AB-rated generic equivalents (e.g., MA, CA) where applicable. The Administration Co-pay Program is not valid for Massachusetts or Rhode Island residents. No party may seek reimbursement for all or any part of the benefit received through the Programs. The Programs are intended for the patient. Only the patient using the Programs may receive the funds made available through the Programs. The Programs are not intended for third parties who reduce the amount available to the patient or take a portion for their own purposes. Patients with health plans that redirect Genentech Program assistance intended for patient out-of-pocket costs may be subject to alternate Program benefit structures. Genentech reserves the right to rescind, revoke or amend the Programs without notice at any time.

Additional terms and conditions apply. Please visit the co-pay Program website for the full list of Terms and Conditions.

View full TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Patients may qualify for drug assistance, administration assistance or both, depending on whether they meet the eligibility criteria.

Independent Co-pay Assistance

An independent co-pay assistance foundation is a charitable organization providing financial assistance to patients with specific disease states, regardless of treatment. Patients who are commercially or publicly insured, including those covered by Medicare and Medicaid, can contact the foundations directly to request assistance. Eligibility requirements, all aspects of the application process, turnaround times and the type or amount of assistance available (if any) can vary by foundation. 

These foundations may be able to help. Please check their websites for up-to-date information.

Advise your patient that these organizations are independent of Genentech and may require the patient to provide personal or financial information directly to the organization to enroll in their respective programs. Genentech cannot share any information the patient has provided to us.

Independent co-pay assistance foundations have their own rules for eligibility. We have no involvement or influence in independent foundation decision-making or eligibility criteria and do not know if a foundation will be able to help your patient. We can only refer your patient to a foundation that supports their disease state. This information is provided as a resource for you. We do not endorse or show preference for any particular foundation. The foundations in this list may not be the only ones that might be able to help your patient.


Genentech Patient Foundation

If patients don’t have health insurance coverage for OCREVUS or have financial concerns and meet eligibility criteria, this program may help:

Genentech Patient Foundation

The Genentech Patient Foundation gives free OCREVUS to people who have been prescribed this medicine and don’t have insurance or that have financial concerns and meet certain eligibility criteria.

Your patient may be eligible if their insurance coverage and income match one of these situations:

  • Uninsured patients with incomes under $150,000
  • Insured patients without coverage for OCREVUS with incomes under $150,000
  • Insured patients with coverage for a Genentech medicine:
    • With unaffordable out-of-pocket costs
    • With household size and income within certain guidelines

For any of these situations, add $25,000 for each extra person in households larger than 4 people.

We encourage insured patients to try other financial assistance options before applying for help from the Genentech Patient Foundation, if possible.

Enrollment Process for the Genentech Patient Foundation

Get started with enrollment by following the steps below.

Option 1: Submit online

If your practice has a registered account for My Patient Solutions, you can get started by logging into your account.

Don't have an account?

Your patient is required to complete the Patient Consent Form. You can either upload their Patient Consent Form as part of your application or have your patient submit the form via fax, text or e-submit.

  • An online tool to help you enroll patients in OCREVUS Access Solutions and manage your service requests at your convenience.

Option 2: Print & fax or text

Step 1: Print one of the Patient Consent Forms below for your patient to complete.

Step 2: Print and complete the Prescriber Foundation Form below.

Step 3: Submit the completed forms via fax or text.

Both forms are required. We must have both the Patient Consent Form and the Prescriber Foundation Form before we can help you. 

What to expect next: HCP

  • The request will be processed within five business days upon receipt of both required forms.
  • Your office will be contacted to discuss any next steps.

If you have any questions about the criteria, please contact a Foundation Specialist at 888-941-3331 (Mon.–Fri., 6AM–5PM PST).


Get Started with Financial Assistance Tool

Use our financial assistance tool to see which programs may be right for your patient.

Get started

  • Commercial insurance: An insurance plan you get from a private health insurance company. This can be insurance from your job, from a plan you bought yourself or from a Health Insurance Marketplace. Medicare and Medicaid are not considered commercial insurance. 

  • Public insurance: A health insurance plan you get from the federal or state government. This includes Medicare, Medicaid, TRICARE and DoD/VA insurance.

  • For example, a household size of 1 with income of less than $75,000 may meet the criteria for assistance. Add $25,000 for each additional person in the household. There is no maximum number of people you may add.

Indications

OCREVUS is indicated for the treatment of:

  • Relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), to include clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting disease, and active secondary progressive disease, in adults
  • Primary progressive MS, in adults.
Contraindications

OCREVUS is contraindicated in patients with active hepatitis B virus infection and in patients with a history of life-threatening infusion reaction to OCREVUS.

Warnings and Precautions
Infusion Reactions

OCREVUS can cause infusion reactions, which can include pruritus, rash, urticaria, erythema, bronchospasm, throat irritation, oropharyngeal pain, dyspnea, pharyngeal or laryngeal edema, flushing, hypotension, pyrexia, fatigue, headache, dizziness, nausea, tachycardia, and anaphylaxis. In multiple sclerosis (MS) clinical trials, the incidence of infusion reactions in OCREVUS-treated patients [who received methylprednisolone (or an equivalent steroid) and possibly other pre-medication to reduce the risk of infusion reactions prior to each infusion] was 34-40%, with the highest incidence with the first infusion. There were no fatal infusion reactions, but 0.3% of OCREVUS-treated MS patients experienced infusion reactions that were serious, some requiring hospitalization.

Observe patients treated with OCREVUS for infusion reactions during the infusion and for at least one hour after completion of the infusion. Inform patients that infusion reactions can occur up to 24 hours after the infusion. Administer pre-medication (e.g., methylprednisolone or an equivalent corticosteroid, and an antihistamine) to reduce the frequency and severity of infusion reactions. The addition of an antipyretic (e.g., acetaminophen) may also be considered. For life-threatening infusion reactions, immediately and permanently stop OCREVUS and administer appropriate supportive treatment. For less severe infusion reactions, management may involve temporarily stopping the infusion, reducing the infusion rate, and/or administering symptomatic treatment.

Infections

A higher proportion of OCREVUS-treated patients experienced infections compared to patients taking REBIF or placebo. In RMS trials, 58% of OCREVUS-treated patients experienced one or more infections compared to 52% of REBIF-treated patients. In the PPMS trial, 70% of OCREVUS-treated patients experienced one or more infections compared to 68% of patients on placebo. OCREVUS increased the risk for upper respiratory tract infections, lower respiratory tract infections, skin infections, and herpes-related infections. OCREVUS was not associated with an increased risk of serious infections in MS patients. Delay OCREVUS administration in patients with an active infection until the infection is resolved.

Respiratory Tract Infections

A higher proportion of OCREVUS-treated patients experienced respiratory tract infections compared to patients taking REBIF or placebo. In RMS trials, 40% of OCREVUS-treated patients experienced upper respiratory tract infections compared to 33% of REBIF-treated patients, and 8% of OCREVUS-treated patients experienced lower respiratory tract infections compared to 5% of REBIF-treated patients. In the PPMS trial, 49% of OCREVUS-treated patients experienced upper respiratory tract infections compared to 43% of patients on placebo and 10% of OCREVUS-treated patients experienced lower respiratory tract infections compared to 9% of patients on placebo. The infections were predominantly mild to moderate and consisted mostly of upper respiratory tract infections and bronchitis.

Herpes

In active-controlled (RMS) clinical trials, herpes infections were reported more frequently in OCREVUS-treated patients than in REBIF-treated patients, including herpes zoster (2.1% vs. 1.0%), herpes simplex (0.7% vs. 0.1%), oral herpes (3.0% vs. 2.2%), genital herpes (0.1% vs. 0%), and herpes virus infection (0.1% vs. 0%). Infections were predominantly mild to moderate in severity. In the placebo-controlled (PPMS) clinical trial, oral herpes was reported more frequently in the OCREVUS-treated patients than in the patients on placebo (2.7% vs 0.8%).

Serious cases of infections caused by herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus, including central nervous system infections (encephalitis and meningitis), intraocular infections, and disseminated skin and soft tissue infections, have been reported in the postmarketing setting in multiple sclerosis patients receiving OCREVUS. Serious herpes virus infections may occur at any time during treatment with OCREVUS. Some cases were life-threatening.

If serious herpes infections occur, OCREVUS should be discontinued or withheld until the infection has resolved, and appropriate treatment should be administered.

Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Reactivation

Hepatitis B reactivation has been reported in MS patients treated with OCREVUS in the postmarketing setting. Fulminant hepatitis, hepatic failure, and death caused by HBV reactivation have occurred in patients treated with anti-CD20 antibodies. Perform HBV screening in all patients before initiation of treatment with OCREVUS. Do not administer OCREVUS to patients with active HBV confirmed by positive results for HBsAg and anti-HB tests. For patients who are negative for surface antigen [HBsAg] and positive for HB core antibody [HBcAb+] or are carriers of HBV [HBsAg+], consult liver disease experts before starting and during treatment.

Possible Increased Risk of Immunosuppressant Effects with Other Immunosuppressants

When initiating OCREVUS after an immunosuppressive therapy or initiating an immunosuppressive therapy after OCREVUS, consider the potential for increased immunosuppressive effect. OCREVUS has not been studied in combination with other MS therapies.

Vaccinations

Administer all immunizations according to immunization guidelines at least 4 weeks prior to initiation of OCREVUS for live or live-attenuated vaccines and, whenever possible, at least 2 weeks prior to initiation of OCREVUS for non-live vaccines. OCREVUS may interfere with the effectiveness of non-live vaccines. The safety of immunization with live or live-attenuated vaccines following OCREVUS therapy has not been studied, and vaccination with live-attenuated or live vaccines is not recommended during treatment and until B-cell repletion.

Vaccination of Infants Born to Mothers Treated with OCREVUS During Pregnancy

In infants of mothers exposed to OCREVUS during pregnancy, do not administer live or live-attenuated vaccines before confirming the recovery of B-cell counts as measured by CD19+ B-cells. Depletion of B-cells in these infants may increase the risks from live or live-attenuated vaccines.

You may administer non-live vaccines, as indicated, prior to recovery from B-cell depletion, but should consider assessing vaccine immune responses, including consultation with a qualified specialist, to assess whether a protective immune response was mounted.

Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML)

Cases of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) have been reported in patients with MS treated with OCREVUS in the postmarketing setting. PML is an opportunistic viral infection of the brain caused by the JC virus (JCV) that typically only occurs in patients who are immunocompromised, and that usually leads to death or severe disability. PML has occurred in OCREVUS-treated patients who had not been treated previously with natalizumab, (which has a known association with PML), were not taking any immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory medications, associated with risk of PML prior to or concomitantly with OCREVUS, and did not have any known ongoing systemic medical conditions resulting in compromised immune system function.

JCV infection resulting in PML has also been observed in patients treated with other anti-CD20 antibodies and other MS therapies.

At the first sign or symptom suggestive of PML, withhold OCREVUS and perform an appropriate diagnostic evaluation. Typical symptoms associated with PML are diverse, progress over days to weeks, and include progressive weakness on one side of the body or clumsiness of limbs, disturbance of vision, and changes in thinking, memory, and orientation leading to confusion and personality changes.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings may be apparent before clinical signs or symptoms of PML. Monitoring with MRI for signs consistent with PML may be useful, and any suspicious findings should lead to further investigation to allow for an early diagnosis of PML, if present.

If PML is confirmed, treatment with OCREVUS should be discontinued.

Reduction in Immunoglobulins

As expected with any B-cell depleting therapy, decreased immunoglobulin levels are observed with OCREVUS treatment. The pooled data of OCREVUS clinical studies (RMS and PPMS) and their open-label extensions (up to approximately 7 years of exposure) have shown an association between decreased levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG<LLN) and increased rates of serious infections. Monitor the levels of quantitative serum immunoglobulins during OCREVUS treatment and after discontinuation of treatment, until B-cell repletion, and especially in the setting of recurrent serious infections. Consider discontinuing OCREVUS therapy in patients with serious opportunistic or recurrent serious infections, and if prolonged hypogammaglobulinemia requires treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins.

Malignancies

An increased risk of malignancy with OCREVUS may exist. In controlled trials, malignancies, including breast cancer, occurred more frequently in OCREVUS-treated patients. Breast cancer occurred in 6 of 781 females treated with OCREVUS and none of 668 females treated with REBIF or placebo. Patients should follow standard breast cancer screening guidelines.

Immune-Mediated Colitis

Immune-mediated colitis, which can present as a severe and acute-onset form of colitis, has been reported in patients receiving OCREVUS in the postmarketing setting. Some cases of colitis were serious, requiring hospitalization, with a few patients requiring surgical intervention. Systemic corticosteroids were required in many of these patients. The time from treatment initiation to onset of symptoms in these cases ranged from a few weeks to years. Monitor patients for immune-mediated colitis during OCREVUS treatment, and evaluate promptly if signs and symptoms that may indicate immune-mediated colitis, such as new or persistent diarrhea or other gastrointestinal signs and symptoms, occur.

Use in Specific Populations
Pregnancy

Pregnancy Exposure Registry
There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy and fetal/neonatal/infant outcomes in women exposed to OCREVUS during pregnancy. Physicians are encouraged to register patients and pregnant women are encouraged to register themselves by calling 1-833-872-4370 or visiting www.ocrevuspregnancyregistry.com.

There are no adequate data on the developmental risk associated with use of OCREVUS in pregnant women. There are no data on B-cell levels in human neonates following maternal exposure to OCREVUS. However, transient peripheral B-cell depletion and lymphocytopenia have been reported in infants born to mothers exposed to other anti-CD20 antibodies during pregnancy. OCREVUS is a humanized monoclonal antibody of an immunoglobulin G1 subtype and immunoglobulins are known to cross the placental barrier.

Lactation

There are no data on the presence of ocrelizumab in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects of the drug on milk production. Ocrelizumab was excreted in the milk of ocrelizumab-treated monkeys. Human IgG is excreted in human milk, and the potential for absorption of ocrelizumab to lead to B-cell depletion in the infant is unknown. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for OCREVUS and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from OCREVUS or from the underlying maternal condition.

Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

Women of childbearing potential should use effective contraception while receiving OCREVUS and for 6 months after the last infusion of OCREVUS.

Most Common Adverse Reactions

RMS: The most common adverse reactions in RMS trials (incidence ≥10% and >REBIF) were upper respiratory tract infections (40%) and infusion reactions (34%).

PPMS: The most common adverse reactions in PPMS trials (incidence ≥10% and >placebo) were upper respiratory tract infections (49%), infusion reactions (40%), skin infections (14%), and lower respiratory tract infections (10%).

You may report side effects to the FDA at (800) FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects to Genentech at (888) 835-2555.

Please see additional Important Safety Information throughout and click here for full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide.

    • OCREVUS [prescribing information]. South San Francisco, CA: Genentech, Inc. 2022.

      OCREVUS [prescribing information]. South San Francisco, CA: Genentech, Inc. 2022.

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      Giovannoni G, Kappos L, de Seze J, et al. Long-term reduction of relapse rate and confirmed disability progression after 7.5 years of ocrelizumab treatment in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis in the OPERA OLE. Poster presented at: 37th Congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS); October 13-15, 2021.

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